Ingrediens needed and Instructions :

 

Things needed :

  • pork loin
  • salt
  • paprika
  • onion powder
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • chicken broth
  • olive oil
  • balsamic vinegar
  • garlic
  • Italian Seasoning

 

Instructions :

  1. Prep: Start out by patting your pork loin dry with paper towels. Combine salt, paprika, onion powder, and black pepper in a small bowl and whisk it to combine. Take the rub and sprinkle it all over the pork.
  2. Sear: Add 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet and set it over medium heat. Add the pork and sear it for a couple minutes on each side or until it is golden brown. This is an optional step – you don’t have to sear the meat, but I suggest it because when you sear meat, it caramelizes the natural sugars in the meat and browns the proteins, forming a delicious brown crust on the surface of the roast.
  3. Cook: Add the chicken broth to the insert of your slow cooker then place the pork loin, fat side up, in the slow cooker and set aside.
  4. In a blender or food processor combine the remaining olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and garlic; and process until it’s combined and thickened. Add your Italian seasoning and whirl for just a couple seconds to combine. Using a pastry brush, brush the prepared balsamic mixture all over the pork loin.
  5. Cover the slow cooker with the lid and cook on LOW for 4 to 5 hours or on HIGH for 3 hours.
  6. Rest and Serve: Remove the pork loin from the slow cooker and transfer to a cutting board. Cover the pork loin with foil and let it rest for 10 to 15 minutes before slicing.

 

HOW LONG DOES PORK LOIN TAKE IN THE CROCK POT?

Most crock pots have three settings, Low, High, and Warm. You can cook your pork loin on either LOW or HIGH, but the amount of time will differ based on which setting you choose.

If you choose to cook on LOW, it will take about 6 to 8 hours depending on exactly how large the loin is. If you choose to cook on HIGH, it will take from 4 to 5 hours. The pork loin is done when cooked in the crock pot is by the color of the juices that come out of it when you poke a hole in it with a knife or fork. If the juices run clear, the pork is done cooking.